Thursday, 27 August 2020

IS IT STILL SAFE TO UBER DURING COVID-19? #RideSafeWithUber

 

  Face maskcheck - New Uber Technology that helps confirm drivers are wearing a face mask

This push notification, along with a few others, came up on my phone over the last few days from my Uber app. And just in time too, now that alcohol is back on sale I need a girls night with some cocktails and that means I need Uber to the rescue.



Over 6 months into the pandemic and life goes on - but it's a little far-fetched to think things are back to normal. Something as simple as Ubering, as effortless as it was pre-pandemic, might bring about a bit of apprehension now. Is our favourite ride-hauling app still safe to use during cover-19?

Uber recently launched their #RideSafeWithUber campaign that brings about changes to the Uber experience to bring both drivers and riders a bit more piece of mind.  As I was briefed on the campaign and Uber's efforts, I was thoroughly impressed by the attention to the smaller details (And things that didn't even cross my mind) that they've decided to implement. 

So, what has Uber decided to do to ensure our safety? Here are the main new additions to your Uber ride experience:




Pre-trip 

  • Drivers will thoroughly sanitise their vehicles before or after every trip to ensure that the strictest measures in hygiene are adhered to and keeping the community safe

  • Sanitisers reimbursement: Drivers are reimbursed for their purchase of a sanitiser or disinfectant of their choice.

  • Interactive Safety Checklist: You'll receive a reminder before each trip to follow hygiene best practices like washing your hands before getting in the car, sitting in the back seat and opening windows for ventilation. (Drivers also receive their checklist that must be completed before taking trips)

  • Mask Detection: Uber has launched a new in-app tool that detects if drivers are wearing a mask or not. Drivers are asked to take a selfie to confirm that they're wearing a mask before going online and riders receive confirmation of this.

  • Free Masks for Riders: A partnership with YES foundation ensured that drivers are provided with free masks to wear on-trip.

On-Trip


  • No Cancellation Penalty: No penalty cancellation before a trip commences whereby either the driver or rider isn't wearing a mask

  • Seating: There is now a maximum seating capacity in place of 50% per vehicle and encourage riders to sit in the backseat to encourage social distancing between riders and driver

  • Contactless Payment: Riders can now prepay for their upcoming trips with Uber Cash, creating a stress-free way to travel, further adding to the convenience this payment method offers. Digital payments help ensure the well-being of both the rider and driver by limiting unnecessary physical contact and it is the encouraged method of payment should travel be necessary. Debit/ Credit, EFT and barter payments are still available! 


Post Trip


  • Safety and Hygiene Feedback:  Both your driver and yourself will be asked to leave feedback in the app regarding safety and hygiene. On the other hand, drivers will also be able to leave feedback if a rider was not wearing a mask or removed their mask.

Personally, I had a few Uber rides since the start of the pandemic and I felt safe every time. The drivers I've had followed protocol 100% but it's also important to realise that a lot of the responsibility rests on us - we are the ones that need to ensure WE'RE following protocol too. But at least we have the peace of mind of knowing that we can Uber our way around town and still feel like our safety is being prioritised. So thanks Uber, and happy travelling guys!



This post is sponsored by Uber South Africa.
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Sunday, 9 August 2020

HOW TO PREVENT MASKNE (MASK ACNE) - SKIN CARE WHILE WEARING A COVID-19 MASK

Cellphone? Check. Wallet? Check. Keys? Check. Facemask? Oh shoot!

Life By Asha Singh wearing a sequins COVID-19 fabric mask



Who would have thought facemarks would become as important as your housekeys in 2020. In many countries, including South Africa, mask wearing is now a part of everyday life and something completely normal. But while they're an awesome barrier to help prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus, they also have other unfortunate consequences. One such consequence being that the friction of the mask against our skin as well as the bacteria that can collect on the inside of the mask, can lead to our skin getting irritated and breakouts occurring more frequently.

"Maskne" is the term for acne that results from wearing a mask, dermatologically known as mask mechanica. This type of acne is commonly triggered by sweat, friction, and pressure on the skin and causes inflammation, unpleasant red rashes and tiny clusters of pimples around the nose and mouth specifically.

This post is a compilation of tips from gentle skincare brand Cetaphil as well as my own tips from what I've experienced personally during this mask-wearing age.

Cetaphil Daily Hydrating Lotion and Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser


How to care for your skin while wearing a mask 


  • Firstly, choose your mask carefully. Your mask should be made of a soft and breathable material. Opt for a 3 layer fabric mask (As N19 masks should be reserved for health workers due to them being in low supply, high demand). Make sure the mask fits snugly but is still comfortable enough that it doesn't bruise your skin

  • Wash your mask properly. You can find guidelines for washing your fabric mask here. Remember to wash both sides of your mask properly

  • Don't touch your face after touching the outside of your mask. Make sure you don't mistakenly touch your face after taking out your mask. The outside of your mask has been exposed to bacteria and touching your face could spread that bacteria (Or worse). Wash your hands with soap after taking out your mask or touching the outside of your mask.

  • Wash your face with a gentle cleanser. It's also a good idea to wash your face after taking out your mask for the day so that any bacteria that collected during the day can be washed away as soon as possible. The Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser is a great cleanser for even the most sensitive skin.
Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser to help prevent maskne
  • Wearing foundation under your mask can cause your pores to get clogged. Also, half your face is covered anyway so why waste your Fenty foundation!

  • Apply a light moisturiser that's not too greasy. Applying a moisturiser that's too heavy or greasy can also clog your pores. The Cetaphil Daily Hydrating Location is a lightweight, oil-free moisturiser with Hyaluronic Acid that provides instant hydration, maintaining the skins protective barrier, and helps to protect skin from dryness.
Cetaphil Daily Hydrating Lotion with Hyaluronic Acid on Life By Asha Singh

  • Don't forget SPF! I think by now we should know how important incorporating sunscreen into our skin care routine is, but somethings even I can be a bit lazy. Even though half our face is covered, SPF is still crucial. Ideally, choose a sunscreen that's mineral based and lightweight so as to not clog your pores.

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Tuesday, 4 August 2020

A GUIDE TO FLYING DURING COVID-19 IN SOUTH AFRICA

Who would have thought our 2020 New Year's resolution of travel would be limited to walks in the backyard and trips to Woolworths. No tropical nights in Bali or the Contiki we've been saving up for. Not even that long weekend trip to Cape Town seemed realistic a couple months ago (And for the most part, doesn't even feel realistic now, 6 months into lockdown!) 

King Shaka Airport in Durban empty during COVID19 lockdown

Since early March the effect of COVID19 started to ripple through the travel industry - yes, that's even before lockdown. At that point, international flights became almost non-existent and domestic travel seemed to slowly decrease in volume - I mean the whole reason COVID19 came to South Africa was because of travel, so it's completely understandable that even before lockdown, people started to feel uneasy about hopping on a plane filled with strangers. When the initial 21 day lockdown began on 27 March, and the complete standstill of airports and planes hit home. And of course it wasn't just us all the way down here in SA, the whole world experienced what might even be the biggest standstill in air traffic since air travel became mainstream.

View of Durban, flights to Durban, FlySafair


As of right now, 4 August 2020, flying is still only reserved for essential travel - with leisure travel not being permitted. While a naughty few (*cough* me) have found sneaky ways to get around legislation, the flight and travel industry are far from their pre-Corona levels.

Johannesburg city, joburg city, airport in Johannesburg

I recently took my first domestic flight since lockdown began (With my last flight having been 9 March 2020 - feels like a lifetime ago) and boy was it different to anything I've experienced before! I thought I'd share a few tips for anyone travelling on what to expect and hopefully it will help take away the anxiety.

I flew DUR - JHB return with Flysafair (Mango Airlines also operates on this route and a few other airlines operate on different domestic routes).

Durban airport, FlySafair plane

TIPS FOR FLYING DURING AND POST COVID19


• Firstly, it’s not as bad as you think BUT don’t get too comfortable - you still need to make sure you sanitize as much as possible! I carried a hand sanitizer and aerosol sanitiser to sanitize my hands and clothes after coming into contact with surfaces

COVID19 coronavirus vending machine COVID19 essentials

• There are very few flights a day - only 5 at most on the DUR - JHB route but I booked the day before so it's not imperative to book in advance however with there being so few flights, the flights that are operating tend to be quite full. • You’re only allowed to enter the airport if you’re flying and the first thing you do when you enter is hand in your (Already filled in) health declaration and get a temperature check.

Air travel during COVID19 in South Africa

• The airport is probably gonna be empty. Like resembling a zombie apocalypse empty. Don’t freak out! • Leisure and nonessential travel is still not permitted and legally you do still need a permit to travel - there are lots of different types of permits for whatever reason you need to travel but the most common is a business permit filled in by your employer • There’s a no contact policy - you scan your own boarding pass and instead of handing in your ID at check in, you hold it against the clear petition for them to see. They also ask you to remove your mask for them to confirm your identity. Apart from that you wear your mask the entire time at the airport and during the flightšŸ˜·

Social distancing in South Africa

• Most restaurants and facilities like lounges are closed. At King Shaka, the long stay parking was also closed - rather check in advance and don’t assume everything is operating as normal • On the flight it isn’t a given that you’ll have an empty seat next to you, some airlines give you the option to book the seat next to you to ensure that it’s empty

Full Safair flight during Covid19 •On the plane, services like inflight magazines and drinks and food may not be available onboard
I hope this helped you. Lets support the travel industry as much as we can in the coming months❤️
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